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Can You Actually Floss Too Much?
Posted on 11/9/2020 by Dr. Janice Pliszczak
Can You Actually Floss Too Much?Flossing removes bacteria, food particles, and other harmful debris from the hard to reach spaces in between your teeth. This is, obviously, a very good thing since it prevents cavities from forming between the teeth. However, while flossing does improve your oral health, it is possible to actually floss too much. What damage can over-flossing do, and how much is too much?

What Can Too Much Flossing Lead to?


Flossing too much can actually lead to infections, especially if you floss in a very rough manner. You can damage your gums with too much flossing, and that can lead to infections. You can also accidentally damage a tooth's root by flossing too often or too roughly. Even if you're gentle with your flossing, you can still irritate the tissue of the gums by flossing too often. If you're already dealing with gingivitis, this can cause your gums to bleed and can cause them to recede. This exposes more of the roots of your teeth, which may eventually lead to tooth loss. Very rough, frequent flossing can even damage the bone that holds your teeth in place.

How Much Flossing Is Too Much?


You really only need to floss once per day. Studies have shown that, in addition to potentially damaging your gums, flossing more than that isn't really that effective. You also need to make certain that when you do floss, you're doing so in the correct way. You need to be gentle about it. Flossing vigorously, roughly, or for too long between your teeth can damage the gums and enamel. You want to be gentle with the floss. Floss up and down between the teeth a few times to make certain you've touched all parts of both of them and the gums. There's no need to spend too much time. If you have any questions about flossing or want to learn how to properly floss, give us a call. We can get up an appointment.
C780 Pliszczak image 8 600A Janice Pliszczak, DDS
4827 Broad Road,
Syracuse, NY 13215-2205
Phone: (315) 800-5020

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